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Folder Volume 02, No. 1 (Winter 2002)

  • From the Editor
  • Student Gains in a Privately Managed Network of Charter Schools Using Direct Instruction
  • Teaching Fractions to Middle-School Students
  • Marie Keel: A Remembrance
  • Using Reasoning and Writing With Gifted Fifth-Grade Students
  • Using Reasoning and Writing to Teach Writing Skills to Students With Learning Disabilities and Behavioral Disorders
  • Making the Most of Instructional Time: Teaching Reading at an Accelerated Rate to Students At Risk

Documents

pdf Making the Most of Instructional Time: Teaching Reading at an Accelerated Rate to Students At Risk Popular

This study compared the rate of reading gains of first and second grade students before and after implementation of the Direct Instruction reading program, Reading Mastery. The intent of this study was to determine if reading instruction with Reading Mastery would accelerate at-risk students’ acquisition of reading skills. Results indicate that both first and second graders demonstrated significant differences in rate of reading gain before and after implementation on the Total Reading measure of the Woodcock Reading Mastery Test; additionally, rate of gain on the Word Attack subtest for first graders and Word Identification subtest for second graders were significantly greater following implementation. (Copyright © 2011, National Institute for Direct Instruction (NIFDI). All rights reserved).

pdf Student Gains in a Privately Managed Network of Charter Schools Using Direct Instruction Popular

This study examined the academic achievement effects of the privately managed network of charter schools, Advantage Schools. Advantage Schools employ Direct Instruction curricula across subjects, emphasize accountability for student achievement, have an extended school day and year, and implement a behavior system that focuses on positive reinforcement. Results from the SAT-9 and Woodcock Reading Mastery Test-Revised (WRMT-R) indicate that on average, students learned at an accelerated rate in the 1999-2000 school year, with students in K-2nd grade demonstrating the greatest gains. (Copyright © 2011, National Institute for Direct Instruction (NIFDI). All rights reserved).

pdf Teaching Fractions to Middle-School Students Popular

This study examined the effects of Direct Instruction mathematics instruction with four seventh grade boys with learning disabilities. The DI approach, based on the text, Designing Effective Mathematics Instruction: A Direct Instruction Approach (Stein, Silbert, & Carnine, 1977), included three stages: 1) A target skill is modeled by the teacher, 2) guided practice in this skill is provided until students meet accuracy criteria, and 3) independent practice in the skill is introduced. Two comparison students were taught the same material with traditional textbook instruction. Posttest scores of the students receiving DI were compared to scores of comparison students as well as to the normative group of the KeyMath-R mathematics achievement test. Results indicate that the DI students outperformed the comparison students and exceeded the typical progress of the KeyMath-R normative group. (Copyright © 2011, National Institute for Direct Instruction (NIFDI). All rights reserved).

pdf Using Reasoning and Writing to Teach Writing Skills to Students With Learning Disabilities and Behavioral Disorders Popular

This study examined the effectiveness of the Direct Instruction writing program, Reasoning and Writing, with 10 fourth and fifth grade students with learning disabilities and/or behavioral disorders. Instruction with Reasoning and Writing occurred for six weeks, and pretest and posttest scores on the Test of Written Language-2 (TOWL-2) were used to indicate program effects. As a group, results indicate that students made both statistically and educationally significant gains overall on the TOWL-2. (Copyright © 2011, National Institute for Direct Instruction (NIFDI). All rights reserved).

pdf Using Reasoning and Writing With Gifted Fifth-Grade Students Popular

This study compared the effects of two approaches to teaching reasoning and writing skills to gifted fifth graders. One group of students was taught with the Direct Instruction program, Reasoning and Writing, while the comparison group received non-explicit instruction, typical of most gifted programs. Scores on the Test of Written Language-3 (TOWL-3) and the New Jersey Test of Reasoning Skills (NJTRS) were used to assess writing and reasoning skills. Results indicate that students who received instruction with Reasoning and Writing scored significantly higher on the TOWL-3 measures of writing ability than students who received non-explicit instruction. There were no significant differences between groups on measures of reasoning skills. (Copyright © 2011, National Institute for Direct Instruction (NIFDI). All rights reserved).

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