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Folder Volume 01, No. 2 (Summer 2001)

  • A Survey of Levels of Supervisory Support and Maintenance of Effects Reported by Educators
  • A Comparison of Curriculum-Specified Reading Checkout Timings and Daily 1-Minute Timings
  • Best Practices in Spelling Instruction: A Research Summary
  • What Research Tells Us About Writing Instruction For Students in the Middle Grades
  • The Association Between a Home Reading Program and Young Children’s Early Reading Skill
  • What Reading Does for the Mind

Documents

pdf A Comparison of Curriculum-Specified Reading Checkout Timings and Daily 1-Minute Timings Popular

This study examined the effects of adding a daily 1-minute timed reading following the conclusion of a lesson in Reading Mastery Fast Cycle or Reading Mastery II on performance on curriculum-specified reading checkouts. 4 second and third grade students with learning disabilities received daily instruction with the RM curriculum and were administered regular curriculum-specified reading checkouts, which consisted of a timed reading. Words read per minute and number of errors were compared between Phase I, consisting of only curriculum-specified checkouts, and Phase II, including a daily timed reading in addition to the regular checkouts. Results indicate that students were able to meet the curriculum-specified reading criteria within three checkouts, and that the addition of a daily timed reading did not substantially affect the number of words read and errors made during checkouts. This suggests that the systematic, explicit instruction provided in the RM curriculum provided enough support for students to progress, and that extra daily timed readings don’t seem to affect this progress. (Copyright © 2011, National Institute for Direct Instruction (NIFDI). All rights reserved).

pdf A Survey of Levels of Supervisory Support and Maintenance of Effects Reported by Educators Popular

This study evaluated the responses of 113 educators who have implemented Direct Instruction programs across five DI implementation sites. Respondents were asked to identify the techniques and level of support that have been most useful in their development of new teaching behaviors, as well as the extent to which these teaching behaviors have been maintained over time. Results from the questionnaires provide three general conclusions: 1) The majority of teachers prefer a side-by-side team-teach approach wherein the coach intervenes during the lesson, provides a model and rationale for a particular strategy or method, and then has the teacher replicate the model. 2) Most teachers support the use of immediate in-class feedback as opposed to feedback following the observations. 3) Teachers report that the new teaching behaviors that were acquired through coaching were implemented over time. (Copyright © 2011, National Institute for Direct Instruction (NIFDI). All rights reserved).

pdf Best Practices in Spelling Instruction: A Research Summary Popular

This article reviews the literature on empirically-validated methods of teaching spelling. Research comparing the Direct Instruction curricula, Spelling Mastery and Spelling Through Morphographs is also summarized. (Copyright © 2011, National Institute for Direct Instruction (NIFDI). All rights reserved).

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